Best Hip-Hop of the Instagrams

Instagram saw plenty #TBTs aka Throwback Thursday posts today, (March 5). Although there were many uploaded, it’s safe to say Ludacris had one of the best. The rapper took it back to 2004, posting a scene from Academy Award winning film Crash. As that film is certain to be on nearly everyone’s favorite list, the Larenz Tate accompanied photo racked in likes.Tthe rapper is now gearing up for his eight album release, as well as the debut of yet another film, Furious 7, the seventh installment of the Fast & Furious franchise.

Meek Mill tossed up a post that read “ASSOCIATE YOURSELF WITH PEOPLE WHO SHARE THE SAME MINDSET.” Accented with two Lamborghinis in the background, Meek left the picture without a caption.

As NY was piled in snow, 50 Cent had a quite interesting appearance on the social network. “Listen I’m free tonight if you aren’t busy girl,” he wrote. “What I gotta do send a jet, or Uber?Lol I already took my pants off and it’s snowing.

In pictures: Samsung Galaxy S6, Galaxy S6 edge and HTC One M9

Gizmag gives you a look at the three big smartphone flagships announced at Mobile World Co...

A last-minute illness did a number on our Mobile World Congress plans this year, but we still managed to improvise – sneaking in the troops to get their mitts on the big flagships. Here’s a look at what’s sure to be three of the best-looking phones of 2015, the Samsung Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 edge, along with the HTC One M9… Continue Reading In pictures: Samsung Galaxy S6, Galaxy S6 edge and HTC One M9

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DUMBO-Based Etsy Files For IPO Valued At Up To $100 Million

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — If Brooklyn-based craft seller Etsy goes public later this year, it will be a test of how well the company can balance an explicit social mission with shareholder expectations for making money.

Founded in 2005, Etsy – headquartered at 55 Washington St. — sells everything from a $110,000 antique desk from the 1800s to a $20 handmade antler pendant, and everything in between. In 10 years, it’s grown from a scrappy startup offering craftspeople a way to sell necklaces and needlepoint online to a marketplace of 54 million members that generated $1.93 billion in sales in 2014.

And on Wednesday, Etsy filed for an initial public offering of stock valued at up to $100 million.

The company is more than a folksy, funky brand. It’s a B Corporation, which is a for-profit company with a stated social mission certified by a nonprofit organization called B Lab. In its prospectus filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Etsy says its mission is to build a “human, authentic and community-centric global and local marketplace,” and cites any loss of its B Corp status as a risk factor to its brand.

There are only about 1,000 such B-Corporations worldwide, including Warby Parker, Patagonia and Ben & Jerry’s. But none of them are public companies on their own (Ben & Jerry’s is owned by Unilever). If Etsy does go public, it will be the first test of how well certified B Corps can work on Wall Street.

Analysts agree it makes sense for Etsy’s growth to go public or seek a buyer, but some say it is difficult for companies to maintain their entrepreneurial or social spirit in the face of Wall Street pressure for financial returns.

“It’s going to be a tall order for a management team in the future to be true to its core company values while also delivering shareholder value,” said Forrester analyst Sucharita Mulpuru on Thursday. “When companies go public they’re held accountable for quarterly goals that shareholders want and it’s very, very difficult to stay true to core values.” An Etsy spokeswoman declined to comment citing the company’s quiet period ahead of the IPO.

But the cash infusion that an IPO brings could juice Etsy’s growth. And some Etsy sellers welcome the added awareness an IPO would bring.

“I am excited about the additional attention the site will be receiving,” said Michael Webb, 41, a Colorado artist who sells his art through Etsy and other sites and galleries.

Others are playing wait-and-see.

Holly Marshmueller, 32, has sold her line of new mom and baby products, like handmade changing pads and car seat covers, on Etsy since 2011. She said she understands that an IPO will help Etsy grow, but expects it will bring some changes to the site. When she heard about the expected IPO, she signed up for Shopify to host a shopping cart on her own site so she can sell her goods outside of Etsy.

“I was a little nervous and I wanted to protect my brand,” said the Portland, Oregon, resident.

But she added that she has no plans to close her Etsy shop.

“I’m positively curious about how things are going to go,” she said.

Etsy says it will use proceeds from the IPO for working capital and general corporate purposes.

Etsy Inc. plans to list its shares on Nasdaq under the ticker symbol “ETSY.”

(TM and © Copyright 2015 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2015 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

All images and written content is property of the listed RSS FEED if you would like more on this story and images please click the listed feed. http://newyork.cbslocal.com/feed/

DUMBO-Based Etsy Files For IPO Valued At Up To $100 Million

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — If Brooklyn-based craft seller Etsy goes public later this year, it will be a test of how well the company can balance an explicit social mission with shareholder expectations for making money.

Founded in 2005, Etsy – headquartered at 55 Washington St. — sells everything from a $110,000 antique desk from the 1800s to a $20 handmade antler pendant, and everything in between. In 10 years, it’s grown from a scrappy startup offering craftspeople a way to sell necklaces and needlepoint online to a marketplace of 54 million members that generated $1.93 billion in sales in 2014.

And on Wednesday, Etsy filed for an initial public offering of stock valued at up to $100 million.

The company is more than a folksy, funky brand. It’s a B Corporation, which is a for-profit company with a stated social mission certified by a nonprofit organization called B Lab. In its prospectus filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Etsy says its mission is to build a “human, authentic and community-centric global and local marketplace,” and cites any loss of its B Corp status as a risk factor to its brand.

There are only about 1,000 such B-Corporations worldwide, including Warby Parker, Patagonia and Ben & Jerry’s. But none of them are public companies on their own (Ben & Jerry’s is owned by Unilever). If Etsy does go public, it will be the first test of how well certified B Corps can work on Wall Street.

Analysts agree it makes sense for Etsy’s growth to go public or seek a buyer, but some say it is difficult for companies to maintain their entrepreneurial or social spirit in the face of Wall Street pressure for financial returns.

“It’s going to be a tall order for a management team in the future to be true to its core company values while also delivering shareholder value,” said Forrester analyst Sucharita Mulpuru on Thursday. “When companies go public they’re held accountable for quarterly goals that shareholders want and it’s very, very difficult to stay true to core values.” An Etsy spokeswoman declined to comment citing the company’s quiet period ahead of the IPO.

But the cash infusion that an IPO brings could juice Etsy’s growth. And some Etsy sellers welcome the added awareness an IPO would bring.

“I am excited about the additional attention the site will be receiving,” said Michael Webb, 41, a Colorado artist who sells his art through Etsy and other sites and galleries.

Others are playing wait-and-see.

Holly Marshmueller, 32, has sold her line of new mom and baby products, like handmade changing pads and car seat covers, on Etsy since 2011. She said she understands that an IPO will help Etsy grow, but expects it will bring some changes to the site. When she heard about the expected IPO, she signed up for Shopify to host a shopping cart on her own site so she can sell her goods outside of Etsy.

“I was a little nervous and I wanted to protect my brand,” said the Portland, Oregon, resident.

But she added that she has no plans to close her Etsy shop.

“I’m positively curious about how things are going to go,” she said.

Etsy says it will use proceeds from the IPO for working capital and general corporate purposes.

Etsy Inc. plans to list its shares on Nasdaq under the ticker symbol “ETSY.”

(TM and © Copyright 2015 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2015 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

All images and written content is property of the listed RSS FEED if you would like more on this story and images please click the listed feed. http://newyork.cbslocal.com/feed/

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