Tomato and egg waste may end up in your tires

A sample of the not-so-black rubber

A typical automobile tire is composed of about 30 percent carbon black, which is a filler that adds durability to the rubber. Carbon black is petroleum-based, however, meaning that it isn’t entirely eco-friendly to manufacture. That’s why Ohio State University scientists led by Katrina Cornish have been experimenting with a “greener” and more readily-available alternative – namely egg shells and tomato skins.

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Category: Environment

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Nike’s HyperAdapt 1.0 Is Re-Releasing This Week

Still haven’t been able to get your hands on a pair of Nike’s new, innovative HyperAdapt 1.0? Well, you’ll have another chance this week as on Thursday, March 9, the Swoosh will be making available the self-lacing sneaker via draw.

Arriving in both “Black/White-Blue Lagoon” and “Metallic Silver/Black-White” colorways, if you are selected via the online process, your pair in your chosen size will be available for purchase and pick up in-store at select locations in NYC, Miami, Chicago, LA, SF and Portland on March 11. Follow @NikeNYC, @NikeMiami, @NikeChicago, @NikeLA, @NikeSF and @NikePortland for instructions on how to enter the draw in your chosen city.

Best of luck!

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Subaru sticks to the formula with latest XV

The new XV on show in Geneva

Few car manufacturers play their role better than Subaru. As other brands are trying to appear more luxurious or sportier, the team in Tokyo just keeps turning out dependable all-wheel drive hatchbacks, wagons and sedans for people who want to get where they’re going whatever the weather. The new XV sticks to the formula, with chunkier looks and a higher ride than the standard Impreza for extra lifestyle appeal.

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Category: Automotive

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Steph Lecor- “I Know You Ain’t” (featuring Migos)

Steph Lecor, 1st Lady of DJ Khaled‘s We The Best Music Group, releases single “I Know You Ain’t” featuring Migos, who are currently one of hip hop’s elite groups. Ms. Lecor has been hard at work in the studio putting together the right music for her fans and is gearing up for a big 2017! “I Know You Ain’t,” produced by Lamb & Bigg D, is the follow up to her debut hit single “Saturday.” Check out the track below.

Steph Lecor- “I Know You Ain’t” (featuring Migos)

Steph Lecor, 1st Lady of DJ Khaled‘s We The Best Music Group, releases single “I Know You Ain’t” featuring Migos, who are currently one of hip hop’s elite groups. Ms. Lecor has been hard at work in the studio putting together the right music for her fans and is gearing up for a big 2017! “I Know You Ain’t,” produced by Lamb & Bigg D, is the follow up to her debut hit single “Saturday.” Check out the track below.

Steph Lecor- “I Know You Ain’t” (featuring Migos)

Steph Lecor, 1st Lady of DJ Khaled‘s We The Best Music Group, releases single “I Know You Ain’t” featuring Migos, who are currently one of hip hop’s elite groups. Ms. Lecor has been hard at work in the studio putting together the right music for her fans and is gearing up for a big 2017! “I Know You Ain’t,” produced by Lamb & Bigg D, is the follow up to her debut hit single “Saturday.” Check out the track below.

SXSW Organizers Amend Contract After Immigration Controversy

Following widespread online scrutiny, South by Southwest organizers have updated their performance agreement to lessen the threat of deportation for international artists who do not abide by the contract. The festival released a statement on Tuesday outlining how it is updating its language.

Beginning next year, performance agreements will no longer contain language saying the fest reserved the right to notify immigration police of artists who could “adversely affect the viability of artist’s official showcase.” However, it is reserving the right to contact local authorities of situations that endanger people. It said it would not go beyond local authorities, though, when it came to such matters.

“In this political climate, especially as it relates to immigration, we recognize the heightened importance of standing together against injustice,” the statement read. Additionally, it said, “We would like to again apologize for the language in our agreements. We care deeply about the community we serve, and our event is a welcome and safe space for all people.”

The festival added that it does not have the power to deport an artist, reveal an artist’s immigration status or “collude with” immigration agencies such as Immigration and Customs Enforcement or Customs and Border Protection.

Last week, the frontperson of the indie-rock group Told Slant, Felix Walworth, tweeted out a screenshot of the contract and decried the festival’s threatening language. “That they’re willing to threaten deportation is enough evidence for me that they don’t care about anyone including the artists that lend them their legitimacy,” they wrote.

The CEO and co-founder of the fest, Roland Swenson, issued a statement that day refuting Walworth’s claims, calling the situation a misunderstanding. But the festival organizers released another statement last Friday saying they had been confused initially by Walworth’s claims – “we believed this artist had taken our language out of context” – and apologized.

In the meantime, dozens of artists – including Downtown Boys, Killer Mike, Ted Leo and Kimya Dawson – signed an open letter to the festival, asking them to amend the contract.

“We applaud SXSW’s decision to stand with immigrants and against ICE, and are thrilled that collective action from musicians has worked to push a massive institution into taking a principled stand on an issue with ramifications far beyond next week’s festival in Austin,” read a joint statement from the artists behind the open letter.

“The effort shows that artists can and must take collective action to fight unjust policies within the cultural sphere,” they added. “At this critical time we need to bring the struggle to every institution, and with this victory we’ve shown how it can be done.”   

Read the full statement:

With the announcement of President Trump’s latest Travel Ban, SXSW would like to reaffirm its public opposition to these executive orders and provide ongoing support to the artists traveling from foreign countries to our event.

To reinforce that stance, we would like to address the concerns regarding the language in our artist invitation letter and performance agreement for the SXSW Music Festival.

SXSW will do the following:

  • We will change the language in our artist invitation letter and performance agreement for 2018 and beyond.
    • We will remove the option of notifying immigration authorities in situations where a foreign artist might “adversely affect the viability of Artist’s official showcase.”
      • Safety is a primary concern for SXSW, and we report any safety issues to local authorities. It is not SXSW’s duty or authority to escalate a matter beyond local authorities.

In this political climate, especially as it relates to immigration, we recognize the heightened importance of standing together against injustice.

While SXSW works to be in compliance with U.S. immigration law, it is important to know that:

  • SXSW has not, does not, and will not, disclose an artist’s immigration status, except when required by law.
  • SXSW does not have the power to deport anyone.
  • There are no “deportation clauses” in our current performance agreements. There will be no “deportation clauses” in our future participant agreements.
  • SXSW does not “collude with” any immigration agencies including ICE, CBP or USCIS to deport anyone.
  • Each year SXSW coordinates with hundreds of international acts coming to SXSW to try and mitigate issues at U.S. ports of entry. This year we are working to build a coalition of attorneys to assist any who face problems upon arrival in the States.
  • In the 31 years of SXSW’s existence, we have never reported any artist or participant to any immigration agency.

We would like to again apologize for the language in our agreements. We care deeply about the community we serve, and our event is a welcome and safe space for all people.

Statement From Organizers Behind SXSW Boycott and Open Letter

Today, SXSW released a blog post stating clearly that they will remove language from their contract and communications with artists that threatened international performers with deportation for playing at unofficial shows. Downtown Boys, Evan Greer, Priests, and Told Slant, artists who organized an open letter and petition effort around the language, released the following statement:

After mounting pressure from artists and the public, SXSW has chosen to do the right thing and has apologize for their contract language, pledged to remove deportation language from future contract, and promised not to work with ICE at this year’s festival. They also strongly condemned Trump’s immigration policies and his Muslim band. We applaud SXSW’s decision to stand with immigrants and against ICE, and are thrilled that collective action from musicians has worked to push a massive institution into taking a principled stand on an issue with ramifications far beyond next week’s festival in Austin.

SXSW’s decision was made following our collective effort from over 80+ artists – most of whom are scheduled to perform at the festival – to pressure the festival to make the changes. We sent out a public letter, a public petition was passed around, and masses of people called, tweeted, and emailed SXSW demanding that they make the changes. After some negotiating, the festival finally agreed to our demands. The effort shows that artists can and must take collective action to fight unjust policies within the cultural sphere. At this critical time we need to bring the struggle to every institution, and with this victory we’ve shown how it can be done. We’ve not only sent a message to large music festivals everywhere, but also to ICE and the Trump administration. We will fight them at every turn.

There’s so much more work to do, but we also want to celebrate this victory. Let’s keep pushing, and using our music as a tool and a weapon to change the world.


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