Migos and Gucci Mane Throw a Pool Party in “Slippery”

As today marks the beginning of their Nobody Safe Tour with Future, Young Thug, Torey Lanez and A$AP Ferg, Migos commemorate the occasion by releasing yet another visual in support of C U L T U R E. Accordingly, here we see the official aesthetic for “Slippery” featuring Gucci Mane.

Once again, we find Daps directing the clip, as the Atlanta trio takes to sunny Miami to throw a pool party for Quavo’s birthday. Of course, Takeoff and Offset are there as well, in addition to collaborator Gucci Mane, Diddy, and a slew of beautiful women.

After watching the “Slippery” aesthetic above, see underneath for the Nobody Safe Tour dates.

5/4 – Memphis, TN – Fedex Forum
5/11 – Bristow, VA – Jiffy Lube Live
5/12 – Camden, NJ – BB&T Pavillion
5/13 – Raleigh, NC – Walnut Creek Amphitheatre
5/14 – Charlotte, NC – PNC Music Pavillion
5/16 – Toronto, CA – Budweiser Stage
5/19 – Brooklyn, NY – Barclays Center
5/20 – Hartford, CT – Xfinity Theater
5/21 – Mashantucket, CT – Grand Theater at Foxwoods Resort Casino ***
5/23 – Mansfield, MA – Xfinity Center
5/24 – Darien Center, NY – Darien Lake Performing Arts Center
5/25 – Pittsburgh, PA – Keybank Pavillion
5/27 – Cuyahoga Falls, OH – Blossom Music Center
5/29 – Corpus Christi, TX – Concrete Street Amphitheater ***
5/31 – Cincinnati, OH – Riverbend Music Center
6/1 – St. Louis, MO – Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre
6/2 – Chicago, IL – Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre
6/3 – Indianapolis, IN – Klipsch Music Center
6/4 – Kansas City, MO – Sprint Center
6/7 – Edmonton, CA – Rogers Place
6/8 – Kennewick, WA – Toyota Center Kennewick ***
6/9 – Vancouver, CA – Pepsi Live at Rogers Arena
6/10 – Seattle, WA – White River Amphitheatre
6/13 – Mountainview, CA – Shoreline Amphitheatre
6/14 – Sacramento, CA – Toyota Amphitheatre
6/15 – Mountainview, CA – Shoreline Amphitheatre
6/16 – Los Angeles, CA – The Forum
6/22 – Houston, TX – Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavillion
6/27 – San Diego, CA – Sleep Train Amphitheatre
6/28 – Phoenix, AZ – AK-Chin Pavillion
6/29 – Albuquerque, NM – Isleta Amphitheatre
6/30 – Las Vegas, NV – T-Mobile Arena

***Not part of ‘Nobody Safe Tour’

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Judge Not?

Judge Not?

Jesus said, “Judge not, that you be not judged. For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you” (Matthew 7:1–2).

This teaching of Jesus is widely misunderstood. A common reduction we often hear is, “Don’t judge me.” What’s interesting is that this reduction is the inverse application of Jesus’s lesson. Jesus is not telling others not to judge us; he’s telling us not to judge others. What others do is not our primary concern; what we do is our primary concern. Our biggest problem is not how others judge us, but how we judge others.

Caution: Judge at Your Own Risk

Actually, when Jesus says, “Judge not,” he’s not really issuing a prohibition on judging others; he’s issuing a serious warning to take great care how we judge others. We know this because Jesus goes on to say,

“Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when there is the log in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye.” (Matthew 7:3–5)

It’s not wrong to lovingly help our brother remove a harmful speck from his eye. It’s wrong to self-righteously point out a speck in our brother’s eye when we ignore, as no big deal, the ridiculous log protruding from our own.

So, Jesus is placing, as it were, a neon-red-blinking sign over others that tells us, “Caution: judge at your own risk.” It is meant to give us serious pause and examine ourselves before saying anything. Our fallen nature is profoundly selfish and proud and often hypocritical, judging ourselves indulgently and others severely. We are quick to strain gnats and swallow camels (Matthew 23:24), quick to take tweezers to another’s eye when we need a forklift for our own. It is better to “judge not” than to judge like this, since we will be judged in the same way we judge others.

Jesus takes judgment very seriously. He is the righteous judge (2 Timothy 4:8), who is full of grace and truth (John 1:14). He does not judge by appearances, but judges with right judgment (John 7:24). Every judgment he pronounces issues from his core loving nature (1 John 4:8).

Therefore, when we judge, and Scripture instructs Christians to judge at times (1 Corinthians 5:12), we must take great care that our judgment, like Christ’s, is always charitable.

Be Quick to Believe Innocence

The first way to take great care how we judge is to be slow to pronounce guilt when evidence is scant or hearsay or ambiguous. This runs counter not only to fallen human nature, but also our media-saturated culture that encourages hair-trigger judgments. We are wise to practice something codified in our judicial system.

In the United States, when a person is accused of a legal transgression, but the evidence against him is inconclusive, our jurisprudence demands we presume his innocence until sufficient evidence can demonstrate his guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. Such demonstration is typically not quick or easy.

Be Thorough Before Pronouncing Guilt

Circumstantial evidence is not placed before a “reasonable” judge who then renders a verdict based merely on his judicial common sense interpretation. Millennia of human history have taught us that appearances can be deceiving and “reasonable” people have conscious and unconscious biases that shape how they interpret evidence.

So, our courts demand a rigorous process of evaluating evidence in an effort to ensure that deceptive appearances and biases do not distort the truth. This process requires diligence, patience, and restraint. And while reasonable doubt regarding a person’s guilt persists, we are bound to believe — at least in a legal sense — the best about that person. We give him “the benefit of the doubt.”

When Paul wrote, “love believes all things” (1 Corinthians 13:7), he was talking about this kind of charitable judgment. Christians are called to believe the best about each other until sufficient evidence confirms beyond a reasonable doubt that a transgression has occurred.

Aim for Restoration

When evidence does confirm that a transgression has occurred, a second way we take great care how we judge is to “aim for restoration” (2 Corinthians 13:11).

If we’re personally involved in such a situation, our goal in confronting someone caught in sin or, if necessary, initiating a process of church discipline, is to gain back our brother or sister (Matthew 18:15). Our goal is not punitive, but redemptive. We must vigilantly remain “kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave [us]” (Ephesians 4:32). Even if the guilty person is unrepentant and fellowship must be severed, the purpose remains redemptive for the offender (1 Corinthians 5:5) and for the church (1 Corinthians 5:6).

Keep Quiet If Possible

If we’re not personally involved or are distant observers, we can still aim for the person’s restoration by, if possible, not saying anything. A wise rule of thumb: the greater our distance, the greater our ignorance. And ignorant commentary about a person or situation is never helpful and is usually nothing more than gossip or slander, which Jesus calls evil (Matthew 15:19).

We must remember how faulty our perceptions are and how biases distort our judgment. We often think we understand what’s going on, when in reality we do not. From a distance, love covering a multitude of sins (1 Peter 4:8) looks like not repeating a matter (Proverbs 17:9).

Judge with Right Judgment

How we judge others says far more about us than how we are judged by others. This is why God will judge us in the manner we judge others, not in the manner they judge us. Therefore, we must judge with right judgment (John 7:24). And right judgment is charitably quick to believe innocence, charitably slow to pronounce guilt, charitably redemptive when it must be, and charitably silent if at all possible.

And when in doubt, “judge not.”

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