Chris Young Tackles Breakups, Bigger Responsibilities With New Album

Four albums and six chart-topping singles into his career, Chris Young is no longer “that guy from the Nashville Star talent show.” He’s grown into a real Nashville star, occupying a reliable niche as the romantically in-tune good guy, crooning smooth come-ons like “Gettin’ You Home (The Black Dress Song),” “Tomorrow” and “Who I Am With You.”

His fifth studio album, I’m Comin’ Over, is set for release November 13th, and Young says fans can expect more of that proven formula — passionate songs about love, break-ups and attempts to move on — delivered with an added personal touch.

“I think love — or the lack of it — is easily relatable for everybody,” he tells Rolling Stone Country. “There’s always other [topics], as least for me as a songwriter. There’s a summer song on this record and different things, for sure, but falling in love and falling out of love — trying to decide whether you’re in or out of it, all that stuff — is really easily relatable for people. I’ve definitely lived my share of love songs and breakup songs.”

Young co-produced the album with Corey Crowder, a career first that leaves the star’s fingerprints all over each verse, chorus and bridge. The added involvement sets I’m Comin’ Over apart from Young’s previous releases, showing an artist who’s ready to take his direction into his own hands. 

“There’s a lot more work on the front end [as well as] in the studio after,” Young says of the production process. “I like to think I got to do some of the more tedious stuff this time. It wasn’t just listening to a mix and saying, ‘Man, I remember this one part.’ It was everything from pre-production to piecing together every single part that’s on the record. I listened to every single note that is played by every single instrument. . .entirely too many times.”

I’m Comin’ Over,” the project’s title track and current single, finds its narrator struggling to define a red-hot but tumultuous relationship. Even though he knows it’s wrong, he just can’t stay away. With a beating-heart rhythm and Young’s casual baritone hitting the “screw it” theme perfectly, the love-sick, mid-tempo tune is currently rising toward the Top 20 on Billboard‘s Country Airplay chart. Young, who co-wrote the song with Crowder and Josh Hoge, says he’s felt like that guy before.

“I don’t think breakups are ever easy for anybody,” he explains. “If they are, they aren’t much of a breakup. But when you look at ‘I’m Comin’ Over,’ whether it is the end of the relationship or not, it’s definitely the end of that part where you’re like, ‘Hey, what are we doing here? Is this thing gonna keep going? Is it gonna end? What is it?'”

Later on, Young gets wrapped up in his own warm-fuzzies with “What If I Stay,” finds a girl who competes him during “Callin’ My Name” and feels the effects of a spoiled-love hangover on “Sober Saturday Night.”

With so much emotion flying around, Young balances things out by also adding the beachy, feel-good flow of “Sunshine Overtime” and a muscle-bound, country football anthem called “Underdogs.” Still, he shines brightest when he speaks from the heart, as he does on “Think of You.” A striking, clear-eyed duet sung from the other side of a breakup, the song features Cassadee Pope as Young’s singing partner.

“It’s really exciting for me for a couple of reasons,” he says of the song. “One, it’s a male-female duet, which I’ve never put on a record, and two is that I got to do it with Cassadee Pope, who is just a phenomenal singer, and a really, really cool person.”

The insightful duet follows a former couple as they search for new roles inside their social circle post-flameout. Like “I’m Comin’ Over,” it was also written by Young, Crowder and Hoge, who teamed up for six of the album’s 11 tracks.

“It is a little bit different because if you tell somebody, ‘Hey, we wrote a male-female duet,’ they’re going to instantly think it’s a ballad,” says Young. “But this one is not; it’s more of a tempo song, and it’s an interesting perspective on how when you’re in a relationship with somebody for so long, all of your friends start to think of you as a pair. So when that’s over, it can be really strange, not only for you, but also for the people you’re around.”

I’m Comin’ Over arrives November 13th, several weeks after Young kicks off his winter tour of the same name with special guests Eric Paslay and Clare Dunn.

A Guide to Turkey’s Turquoise Coast

turquoise-coast

Legend has it that upon marrying Cleopatra, Mark Antony gifted her the Turkish Riviera as a wedding present, such was its astounding natural beauty. In that respect not much has changed on Turkey’s sweltering south-western coastline. Stretching from Çeşme to Alanya, with the Mediterranean on one side and the Baba, Akdağ and Bey mountains on the other, the region dubbed the Turquoise Coast is still captivating visitors two-thousand or so years later.

Marmaris & Fethiye

Boats in Fethiye harbour
Fethiye harbour

For the purpose of exploring the Turkish Riviera, Dalaman is regarded as the best option for those jetting in. A straight-forward hour drive away, Marmaris is undoubtedly the most popular destination for travellers flocking to this part of the world and its ‘party town’ reputation is well-deserved. Consequentially, this has allowed its southern neighbour Fethiye to go somewhat under the radar. Built on the site of the ancient dwelling of Telmessos, the harbour town’s most distinguishable feature is the Tomb of Amyntas, a can’t-miss rock-face temple that dates back to 350BC.

The Lycian Way

Kalkan
The town of Kalkan, one of the many sites viewable from the Lycian Way

The 540-kilometre Lycian Way links Fethiye and Antalya, the area’s largest city. Rising into the mountains, the hiking trail offers splendid photo opportunities of the landscape below. Particular highlights include the ridgetop walk to Finike, the climb to Mount Olympus and the jaw-dropping views you’ll get high above Kas and Kalkan.

Antalya

Statues inside the Antalya Museum
One of the many sculptures found in the Antalya Archaeological Museum – image by Devrim PINAR

Further west, you’d be amiss to forgo a trip to Antalya – though not to pay a visit to the city’s flash new resorts, but rather for the pull of spending time in the city’s Archaeological Museum. Its comprehensive collection shows off the regions’ rich history, with exhibitions focusing on discoveries from as far back as the Stone Age to the Byzantine and Ottoman eras. It is also among the leading museums in the world for Roman sculptures, with the marble statue of Heracles proving to be a particular highlight for art and history lovers alike.

Phaselis

Ruins
The ancient ruins of Phaselis

But if you prefer your history out in the open air, the many archaeological sites on the Turquoise Coast should mean you’re never too far away from something special. One such example is the ancient city of Phaselis, found just an hour to the north of Antalya. This once-thriving port specialised in the export of timber and perfume. Its small, secluded coves make it a popular place for yachts to drop anchor, and those who take a stroll down Harbour Way will be rewarded by discovering the city’s picturesque Roman theatre.

Aspendos

Aspendos Amphitheatre
Aspendos Amphitheatre

Staying on the same lines, to find not only Turkey’s, but the world’s best preserved Roman amphitheatre, you only need make the trip to Apsendos. Built during the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius, the awe-inspiring 15,000-seater theatre is, for good reason, one of the more frequented tourist attractions in the area, and is still used as a venue for operas and concerts to this day.

Alanya

The Red Tower in Alanya, Turkey
Alanya and the Red Tower

As you travel further east, one of the last major resorts comes in the form of Alanya, a town that has seen a dramatic increase in tourism in the last decade. With an average temperature of 27°C in the summer months it is one of Turkey’s hottest locations, which only goes to make the prospect of staying firmly glued to the sun-lounger by the sea an even more appealing notion. But that shouldn’t stop visitors from making the one-hour climb to the domineering Seljuk-era castle, or the equally impressive Red Tower. With both offering splendid views of the town below, the beachside destination certainly proves to be one of the more photographic settings on the Turquoise Coast.

 

Have any other ideas about where is best to visit on the Turkish Riviera? Leave us a comment below!

All images and written content is property of the listed RSS FEED if you would like more on this story and images please click the listed feed. http://blog.dealchecker.co.uk/feed/

A Guide to Turkey’s Turquoise Coast

turquoise-coast

Legend has it that upon marrying Cleopatra, Mark Antony gifted her the Turkish Riviera as a wedding present, such was its astounding natural beauty. In that respect not much has changed on Turkey’s sweltering south-western coastline. Stretching from Çeşme to Alanya, with the Mediterranean on one side and the Baba, Akdağ and Bey mountains on the other, the region dubbed the Turquoise Coast is still captivating visitors two-thousand or so years later.

Marmaris & Fethiye

Boats in Fethiye harbour
Fethiye harbour

For the purpose of exploring the Turkish Riviera, Dalaman is regarded as the best option for those jetting in. A straight-forward hour drive away, Marmaris is undoubtedly the most popular destination for travellers flocking to this part of the world and its ‘party town’ reputation is well-deserved. Consequentially, this has allowed its southern neighbour Fethiye to go somewhat under the radar. Built on the site of the ancient dwelling of Telmessos, the harbour town’s most distinguishable feature is the Tomb of Amyntas, a can’t-miss rock-face temple that dates back to 350BC.

The Lycian Way

Kalkan
The town of Kalkan, one of the many sites viewable from the Lycian Way

The 540-kilometre Lycian Way links Fethiye and Antalya, the area’s largest city. Rising into the mountains, the hiking trail offers splendid photo opportunities of the landscape below. Particular highlights include the ridgetop walk to Finike, the climb to Mount Olympus and the jaw-dropping views you’ll get high above Kas and Kalkan.

Antalya

Statues inside the Antalya Museum
One of the many sculptures found in the Antalya Archaeological Museum – image by Devrim PINAR

Further west, you’d be amiss to forgo a trip to Antalya – though not to pay a visit to the city’s flash new resorts, but rather for the pull of spending time in the city’s Archaeological Museum. Its comprehensive collection shows off the regions’ rich history, with exhibitions focusing on discoveries from as far back as the Stone Age to the Byzantine and Ottoman eras. It is also among the leading museums in the world for Roman sculptures, with the marble statue of Heracles proving to be a particular highlight for art and history lovers alike.

Phaselis

Ruins
The ancient ruins of Phaselis

But if you prefer your history out in the open air, the many archaeological sites on the Turquoise Coast should mean you’re never too far away from something special. One such example is the ancient city of Phaselis, found just an hour to the north of Antalya. This once-thriving port specialised in the export of timber and perfume. Its small, secluded coves make it a popular place for yachts to drop anchor, and those who take a stroll down Harbour Way will be rewarded by discovering the city’s picturesque Roman theatre.

Aspendos

Aspendos Amphitheatre
Aspendos Amphitheatre

Staying on the same lines, to find not only Turkey’s, but the world’s best preserved Roman amphitheatre, you only need make the trip to Apsendos. Built during the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius, the awe-inspiring 15,000-seater theatre is, for good reason, one of the more frequented tourist attractions in the area, and is still used as a venue for operas and concerts to this day.

Alanya

The Red Tower in Alanya, Turkey
Alanya and the Red Tower

As you travel further east, one of the last major resorts comes in the form of Alanya, a town that has seen a dramatic increase in tourism in the last decade. With an average temperature of 27°C in the summer months it is one of Turkey’s hottest locations, which only goes to make the prospect of staying firmly glued to the sun-lounger by the sea an even more appealing notion. But that shouldn’t stop visitors from making the one-hour climb to the domineering Seljuk-era castle, or the equally impressive Red Tower. With both offering splendid views of the town below, the beachside destination certainly proves to be one of the more photographic settings on the Turquoise Coast.

 

Have any other ideas about where is best to visit on the Turkish Riviera? Leave us a comment below!

All images and written content is property of the listed RSS FEED if you would like more on this story and images please click the listed feed. http://blog.dealchecker.co.uk/feed/

A Guide to Turkey’s Turquoise Coast

turquoise-coast

Legend has it that upon marrying Cleopatra, Mark Antony gifted her the Turkish Riviera as a wedding present, such was its astounding natural beauty. In that respect not much has changed on Turkey’s sweltering south-western coastline. Stretching from Çeşme to Alanya, with the Mediterranean on one side and the Baba, Akdağ and Bey mountains on the other, the region dubbed the Turquoise Coast is still captivating visitors two-thousand or so years later.

Marmaris & Fethiye

Boats in Fethiye harbour
Fethiye harbour

For the purpose of exploring the Turkish Riviera, Dalaman is regarded as the best option for those jetting in. A straight-forward hour drive away, Marmaris is undoubtedly the most popular destination for travellers flocking to this part of the world and its ‘party town’ reputation is well-deserved. Consequentially, this has allowed its southern neighbour Fethiye to go somewhat under the radar. Built on the site of the ancient dwelling of Telmessos, the harbour town’s most distinguishable feature is the Tomb of Amyntas, a can’t-miss rock-face temple that dates back to 350BC.

The Lycian Way

Kalkan
The town of Kalkan, one of the many sites viewable from the Lycian Way

The 540-kilometre Lycian Way links Fethiye and Antalya, the area’s largest city. Rising into the mountains, the hiking trail offers splendid photo opportunities of the landscape below. Particular highlights include the ridgetop walk to Finike, the climb to Mount Olympus and the jaw-dropping views you’ll get high above Kas and Kalkan.

Antalya

Statues inside the Antalya Museum
One of the many sculptures found in the Antalya Archaeological Museum – image by Devrim PINAR

Further west, you’d be amiss to forgo a trip to Antalya – though not to pay a visit to the city’s flash new resorts, but rather for the pull of spending time in the city’s Archaeological Museum. Its comprehensive collection shows off the regions’ rich history, with exhibitions focusing on discoveries from as far back as the Stone Age to the Byzantine and Ottoman eras. It is also among the leading museums in the world for Roman sculptures, with the marble statue of Heracles proving to be a particular highlight for art and history lovers alike.

Phaselis

Ruins
The ancient ruins of Phaselis

But if you prefer your history out in the open air, the many archaeological sites on the Turquoise Coast should mean you’re never too far away from something special. One such example is the ancient city of Phaselis, found just an hour to the north of Antalya. This once-thriving port specialised in the export of timber and perfume. Its small, secluded coves make it a popular place for yachts to drop anchor, and those who take a stroll down Harbour Way will be rewarded by discovering the city’s picturesque Roman theatre.

Aspendos

Aspendos Amphitheatre
Aspendos Amphitheatre

Staying on the same lines, to find not only Turkey’s, but the world’s best preserved Roman amphitheatre, you only need make the trip to Apsendos. Built during the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius, the awe-inspiring 15,000-seater theatre is, for good reason, one of the more frequented tourist attractions in the area, and is still used as a venue for operas and concerts to this day.

Alanya

The Red Tower in Alanya, Turkey
Alanya and the Red Tower

As you travel further east, one of the last major resorts comes in the form of Alanya, a town that has seen a dramatic increase in tourism in the last decade. With an average temperature of 27°C in the summer months it is one of Turkey’s hottest locations, which only goes to make the prospect of staying firmly glued to the sun-lounger by the sea an even more appealing notion. But that shouldn’t stop visitors from making the one-hour climb to the domineering Seljuk-era castle, or the equally impressive Red Tower. With both offering splendid views of the town below, the beachside destination certainly proves to be one of the more photographic settings on the Turquoise Coast.

 

Have any other ideas about where is best to visit on the Turkish Riviera? Leave us a comment below!

All images and written content is property of the listed RSS FEED if you would like more on this story and images please click the listed feed. http://blog.dealchecker.co.uk/feed/

A Guide to Turkey’s Turquoise Coast

turquoise-coast

Legend has it that upon marrying Cleopatra, Mark Antony gifted her the Turkish Riviera as a wedding present, such was its astounding natural beauty. In that respect not much has changed on Turkey’s sweltering south-western coastline. Stretching from Çeşme to Alanya, with the Mediterranean on one side and the Baba, Akdağ and Bey mountains on the other, the region dubbed the Turquoise Coast is still captivating visitors two-thousand or so years later.

Marmaris & Fethiye

Boats in Fethiye harbour
Fethiye harbour

For the purpose of exploring the Turkish Riviera, Dalaman is regarded as the best option for those jetting in. A straight-forward hour drive away, Marmaris is undoubtedly the most popular destination for travellers flocking to this part of the world and its ‘party town’ reputation is well-deserved. Consequentially, this has allowed its southern neighbour Fethiye to go somewhat under the radar. Built on the site of the ancient dwelling of Telmessos, the harbour town’s most distinguishable feature is the Tomb of Amyntas, a can’t-miss rock-face temple that dates back to 350BC.

The Lycian Way

Kalkan
The town of Kalkan, one of the many sites viewable from the Lycian Way

The 540-kilometre Lycian Way links Fethiye and Antalya, the area’s largest city. Rising into the mountains, the hiking trail offers splendid photo opportunities of the landscape below. Particular highlights include the ridgetop walk to Finike, the climb to Mount Olympus and the jaw-dropping views you’ll get high above Kas and Kalkan.

Antalya

Statues inside the Antalya Museum
One of the many sculptures found in the Antalya Archaeological Museum – image by Devrim PINAR

Further west, you’d be amiss to forgo a trip to Antalya – though not to pay a visit to the city’s flash new resorts, but rather for the pull of spending time in the city’s Archaeological Museum. Its comprehensive collection shows off the regions’ rich history, with exhibitions focusing on discoveries from as far back as the Stone Age to the Byzantine and Ottoman eras. It is also among the leading museums in the world for Roman sculptures, with the marble statue of Heracles proving to be a particular highlight for art and history lovers alike.

Phaselis

Ruins
The ancient ruins of Phaselis

But if you prefer your history out in the open air, the many archaeological sites on the Turquoise Coast should mean you’re never too far away from something special. One such example is the ancient city of Phaselis, found just an hour to the north of Antalya. This once-thriving port specialised in the export of timber and perfume. Its small, secluded coves make it a popular place for yachts to drop anchor, and those who take a stroll down Harbour Way will be rewarded by discovering the city’s picturesque Roman theatre.

Aspendos

Aspendos Amphitheatre
Aspendos Amphitheatre

Staying on the same lines, to find not only Turkey’s, but the world’s best preserved Roman amphitheatre, you only need make the trip to Apsendos. Built during the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius, the awe-inspiring 15,000-seater theatre is, for good reason, one of the more frequented tourist attractions in the area, and is still used as a venue for operas and concerts to this day.

Alanya

The Red Tower in Alanya, Turkey
Alanya and the Red Tower

As you travel further east, one of the last major resorts comes in the form of Alanya, a town that has seen a dramatic increase in tourism in the last decade. With an average temperature of 27°C in the summer months it is one of Turkey’s hottest locations, which only goes to make the prospect of staying firmly glued to the sun-lounger by the sea an even more appealing notion. But that shouldn’t stop visitors from making the one-hour climb to the domineering Seljuk-era castle, or the equally impressive Red Tower. With both offering splendid views of the town below, the beachside destination certainly proves to be one of the more photographic settings on the Turquoise Coast.

 

Have any other ideas about where is best to visit on the Turkish Riviera? Leave us a comment below!

All images and written content is property of the listed RSS FEED if you would like more on this story and images please click the listed feed. http://blog.dealchecker.co.uk/feed/

A Guide to Turkey’s Turquoise Coast

turquoise-coast

Legend has it that upon marrying Cleopatra, Mark Antony gifted her the Turkish Riviera as a wedding present, such was its astounding natural beauty. In that respect not much has changed on Turkey’s sweltering south-western coastline. Stretching from Çeşme to Alanya, with the Mediterranean on one side and the Baba, Akdağ and Bey mountains on the other, the region dubbed the Turquoise Coast is still captivating visitors two-thousand or so years later.

Marmaris & Fethiye

Boats in Fethiye harbour
Fethiye harbour

For the purpose of exploring the Turkish Riviera, Dalaman is regarded as the best option for those jetting in. A straight-forward hour drive away, Marmaris is undoubtedly the most popular destination for travellers flocking to this part of the world and its ‘party town’ reputation is well-deserved. Consequentially, this has allowed its southern neighbour Fethiye to go somewhat under the radar. Built on the site of the ancient dwelling of Telmessos, the harbour town’s most distinguishable feature is the Tomb of Amyntas, a can’t-miss rock-face temple that dates back to 350BC.

The Lycian Way

Kalkan
The town of Kalkan, one of the many sites viewable from the Lycian Way

The 540-kilometre Lycian Way links Fethiye and Antalya, the area’s largest city. Rising into the mountains, the hiking trail offers splendid photo opportunities of the landscape below. Particular highlights include the ridgetop walk to Finike, the climb to Mount Olympus and the jaw-dropping views you’ll get high above Kas and Kalkan.

Antalya

Statues inside the Antalya Museum
One of the many sculptures found in the Antalya Archaeological Museum – image by Devrim PINAR

Further west, you’d be amiss to forgo a trip to Antalya – though not to pay a visit to the city’s flash new resorts, but rather for the pull of spending time in the city’s Archaeological Museum. Its comprehensive collection shows off the regions’ rich history, with exhibitions focusing on discoveries from as far back as the Stone Age to the Byzantine and Ottoman eras. It is also among the leading museums in the world for Roman sculptures, with the marble statue of Heracles proving to be a particular highlight for art and history lovers alike.

Phaselis

Ruins
The ancient ruins of Phaselis

But if you prefer your history out in the open air, the many archaeological sites on the Turquoise Coast should mean you’re never too far away from something special. One such example is the ancient city of Phaselis, found just an hour to the north of Antalya. This once-thriving port specialised in the export of timber and perfume. Its small, secluded coves make it a popular place for yachts to drop anchor, and those who take a stroll down Harbour Way will be rewarded by discovering the city’s picturesque Roman theatre.

Aspendos

Aspendos Amphitheatre
Aspendos Amphitheatre

Staying on the same lines, to find not only Turkey’s, but the world’s best preserved Roman amphitheatre, you only need make the trip to Apsendos. Built during the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius, the awe-inspiring 15,000-seater theatre is, for good reason, one of the more frequented tourist attractions in the area, and is still used as a venue for operas and concerts to this day.

Alanya

The Red Tower in Alanya, Turkey
Alanya and the Red Tower

As you travel further east, one of the last major resorts comes in the form of Alanya, a town that has seen a dramatic increase in tourism in the last decade. With an average temperature of 27°C in the summer months it is one of Turkey’s hottest locations, which only goes to make the prospect of staying firmly glued to the sun-lounger by the sea an even more appealing notion. But that shouldn’t stop visitors from making the one-hour climb to the domineering Seljuk-era castle, or the equally impressive Red Tower. With both offering splendid views of the town below, the beachside destination certainly proves to be one of the more photographic settings on the Turquoise Coast.

 

Have any other ideas about where is best to visit on the Turkish Riviera? Leave us a comment below!

All images and written content is property of the listed RSS FEED if you would like more on this story and images please click the listed feed. http://blog.dealchecker.co.uk/feed/

A Guide to Turkey’s Turquoise Coast

turquoise-coast

Legend has it that upon marrying Cleopatra, Mark Antony gifted her the Turkish Riviera as a wedding present, such was its astounding natural beauty. In that respect not much has changed on Turkey’s sweltering south-western coastline. Stretching from Çeşme to Alanya, with the Mediterranean on one side and the Baba, Akdağ and Bey mountains on the other, the region dubbed the Turquoise Coast is still captivating visitors two-thousand or so years later.

Marmaris & Fethiye

Boats in Fethiye harbour
Fethiye harbour

For the purpose of exploring the Turkish Riviera, Dalaman is regarded as the best option for those jetting in. A straight-forward hour drive away, Marmaris is undoubtedly the most popular destination for travellers flocking to this part of the world and its ‘party town’ reputation is well-deserved. Consequentially, this has allowed its southern neighbour Fethiye to go somewhat under the radar. Built on the site of the ancient dwelling of Telmessos, the harbour town’s most distinguishable feature is the Tomb of Amyntas, a can’t-miss rock-face temple that dates back to 350BC.

The Lycian Way

Kalkan
The town of Kalkan, one of the many sites viewable from the Lycian Way

The 540-kilometre Lycian Way links Fethiye and Antalya, the area’s largest city. Rising into the mountains, the hiking trail offers splendid photo opportunities of the landscape below. Particular highlights include the ridgetop walk to Finike, the climb to Mount Olympus and the jaw-dropping views you’ll get high above Kas and Kalkan.

Antalya

Statues inside the Antalya Museum
One of the many sculptures found in the Antalya Archaeological Museum – image by Devrim PINAR

Further west, you’d be amiss to forgo a trip to Antalya – though not to pay a visit to the city’s flash new resorts, but rather for the pull of spending time in the city’s Archaeological Museum. Its comprehensive collection shows off the regions’ rich history, with exhibitions focusing on discoveries from as far back as the Stone Age to the Byzantine and Ottoman eras. It is also among the leading museums in the world for Roman sculptures, with the marble statue of Heracles proving to be a particular highlight for art and history lovers alike.

Phaselis

Ruins
The ancient ruins of Phaselis

But if you prefer your history out in the open air, the many archaeological sites on the Turquoise Coast should mean you’re never too far away from something special. One such example is the ancient city of Phaselis, found just an hour to the north of Antalya. This once-thriving port specialised in the export of timber and perfume. Its small, secluded coves make it a popular place for yachts to drop anchor, and those who take a stroll down Harbour Way will be rewarded by discovering the city’s picturesque Roman theatre.

Aspendos

Aspendos Amphitheatre
Aspendos Amphitheatre

Staying on the same lines, to find not only Turkey’s, but the world’s best preserved Roman amphitheatre, you only need make the trip to Apsendos. Built during the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius, the awe-inspiring 15,000-seater theatre is, for good reason, one of the more frequented tourist attractions in the area, and is still used as a venue for operas and concerts to this day.

Alanya

The Red Tower in Alanya, Turkey
Alanya and the Red Tower

As you travel further east, one of the last major resorts comes in the form of Alanya, a town that has seen a dramatic increase in tourism in the last decade. With an average temperature of 27°C in the summer months it is one of Turkey’s hottest locations, which only goes to make the prospect of staying firmly glued to the sun-lounger by the sea an even more appealing notion. But that shouldn’t stop visitors from making the one-hour climb to the domineering Seljuk-era castle, or the equally impressive Red Tower. With both offering splendid views of the town below, the beachside destination certainly proves to be one of the more photographic settings on the Turquoise Coast.

 

Have any other ideas about where is best to visit on the Turkish Riviera? Leave us a comment below!

All images and written content is property of the listed RSS FEED if you would like more on this story and images please click the listed feed. http://blog.dealchecker.co.uk/feed/

Coalition MPs on ‘green lawfare': mung bean soup to treasonous sabotage

Australian politicians are going to considerable trouble explaining why the Abbott government has to limit environmental groups’ legal rights

Here are some of the problems identified by Coalition MPs to explain why the government is trying to limit the ability of environment groups to mount legal challenges to the government’s application of Australia’s environment laws.

Continue reading…









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Apple Unveil New Emoji for iOS 9.1

In yesterday’s Apple event, the tech giant confirmed a few new releases for us to look forward to in the coming months. Among them are these new Emoji set to be part of iOS 9.1. We’ve already seen a teaser of what’s to come in 2016 and with the inception of Emoji-only passcodes, it makes sense that Apple are up to speed with picturing our every command. Users can expect to see an array of random pictures including a taco, unicorn, cute lion, and the middle finger, which is able to be changed with the new skin tone option.

Apple’s iOS 9 update will be free to download on September 16, read more about it here.

The post Apple Unveil New Emoji for iOS 9.1 appeared first on Highsnobiety.

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Letting The Freedom Of Truth Uncover The Value Of Life

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