Man charged with posing as nurse in Aurukun faces further legal action

Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency files more charges against 30-year-old Darwin man relating to allegations he pretended to be a registered nurse

A man facing more than 100 charges for allegedly pretending to be a nurse in a Cape York Indigenous community is facing legal action for lying about registration in Western Australia.

The Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency has filed 11 charges against Nicholas William Crawford in WA, relating to allegations he claimed to be a registered and qualified nurse.

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Man charged with posing as nurse in Aurukun faces further legal action

Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency files more charges against 30-year-old Darwin man relating to allegations he pretended to be a registered nurse

A man facing more than 100 charges for allegedly pretending to be a nurse in a Cape York Indigenous community is facing legal action for lying about registration in Western Australia.

The Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency has filed 11 charges against Nicholas William Crawford in WA, relating to allegations he claimed to be a registered and qualified nurse.

Continue reading…









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Eric Church Exhibit Coming to Country Music Hall of Fame

Visitors to Nashville’s Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum will soon be able to walk through the life and career of Eric Church. The “Like a Wrecking Ball” singer has been tapped as the subject of the venue’s next cameo exhibition, opening September 18th.

Dubbed “Eric Church: Inside the Outsider,” the exhibit will span the musician’s childhood in North Carolina to his platinum-selling, boundary-pushing present. Artifacts hand-picked by Church will include guitars, handwritten lyrics, stage attire and personal photos, among other memorabilia.

Also sure to be on hand are at least a few awards from the singer-songwriter’s burgeoning trophy case, which started accumulating hardware in 2011 on the strength of his game-changing album, Chief. Church was already a radio success before the LP, with six of his seven singles from previous projects Sinners Like Me and Carolina reaching the Top 20. But it was Chief that made him a household name beyond country music, with the album reaching platinum sales certification, topping several critics’ lists and winning both the CMA and ACM awards for Album of the Year.

“All of a sudden we went from the act that was a couple from the headliner, to headliner, and it’s just weird,” Church told Rolling Stone last year of the status boost that accompanied Chief. “I try not to overthink it.”

A fourth studio album, The Outsiders followed in 2014, marking Church’s most sonically adventurous project to date. The rock and metal-tinged project took home Favorite Country Album at the American Country Countdown Awards and has spawned two Number One singles (so far).

Church’s Hall of Fame spotlight follows recent exhibits celebrating Glen Campbell, Trisha Yearwood, Kenny Rogers, Miranda Lambert and most recently, Luke Bryan. “Eric Church: Inside the Outsider” runs through February 2016.

Demanding Answers: Bronx Neighbors Say 311 Calls About Sinkhole Go Nowhere

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — A pock in the pavement on a Bronx street has amounted to something between a nuisance and a nightmare.

Residents said they have tried calling for help, but dialing 311 gets them nowhere. CBS2’s Steve Langford was demanding answers Tuesday.

“What are we waiting for?” said Grace Boscolo. “We don’t want to wait until someone gets hurt.”

The hole in the middle of the 2500 block of Young Avenue in the Baychester section of the Bronx has Boscolo and most of her neighbors calling the city over and over again.

But the hole that remains a hazard has been grating on their cars – and their nerves.

“This is an emergency, so what’s going on?” Boscolo said. “How long does it take for them to process it?”

For an idea of the damage that this sinkhole has caused, there are ridges in the pavement showing where the undercarriages of the cars have gouged right into it.

“I mean, who’s going to take care of this now?” said Dominic Agostino. “(Is) the (Department of Transportation) going to take care of this? (Is) the city going to take care of this?”

The hole measures, at its worst, about 9 inches deep from street level. And while most locals know to drive around it very carefully, there are endless stories about damage to their cars.

“My dad had to have one of the tires on this car fixed because of that,” said Kathy Tortorella.

“I’ve called numerous times,” said Michael Micalizzi.

A quick check of 311 online data showed at least 10 calls from the block to the city since the end of last year.

“It’s a shame that the city has all this money, and nothing’s being taken care of,” Micalizzi said.

The city has paved over the hole at least once, according to neighbors. But the crater remains a danger.

“Get the city to get moving on this,” Boscolo said.

CBS2 called the city and demanded answers. The Mayor’s office and the Department of Environmental Protection said late Tuesday that the hole in the street is the result of two faulty sewer lines that must be fixed by homeowners.

This story came to CBS2 from a viewer. If you have a story idea you would like us to check out, call (855) TWO-TIPS; that is, (855) 896-8477.

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Hiroki Nakamura Travels the World for visvim’s Fall/Winter 2015 Lookbook

Prior to revealing the visvim Fall/Winter 2015 “Dissertation on revealing the practice” collection, Hiroki Nakamura had done an extensive amount of traveling in order to solicit the design tendencies for the new season. His escapades brought him to the UK, then to America’s West Coast where a direction was conceived. A non-ending jet-setting schedule saw him make subsequent stops in Paris, Seattle, Florence, and finally, Florida for fabric development and finishing touches. All that traveling allowed him to absorb a comprehensive world view that can be seen in a selection of militaristic outerwear, casual knitwear and durable layered pieces.

As of now there’s no release date for Fall/Winter 2015 garments, but expect them to arrive online in the near future.

The post Hiroki Nakamura Travels the World for visvim’s Fall/Winter 2015 Lookbook appeared first on Highsnobiety.

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Macklemore Discusses Drug Relapse, New Album

Seattle rapper Macklemore, real name Ben Haggerty, admitted in a new cover story for Complex that he relapsed into taking pills and smoking weed following the monumental success of his 2013 LP with Ryan Lewis, The Heist. His recovery, however, was crucial in inspiring the duo’s new album, slated to arrive later this year.

“I was burnt out,” Haggerty said. “I was super-stressed. We weren’t sleeping — doing a show every day, zigzagging all over the country. In terms of the media, I was getting put into a box that I never saw for myself. The pressure and the fame — everything. All the clichés, man — like not being able to walk around, having no privacy, and from this TV appearance to this TV appearance, and the criticism, and the lack of connection, and the lack of [12-step] meetings — all of that put into one pie was just… I just wanted to escape.”

Haggerty copped to sneaking around to get high and promising to get clean but never following through. Lewis said he noticed a change in his partner’s behavior, too, especially when progress on their new album stalled. But it wasn’t until his fiancé Tricia Davis learned she was pregnant that the rapper again embraced sobriety.

“And, as it always works, the minute that I start actively seeking recovery — not just sobriety, but recovery — music is there,” Haggerty said. “It always has been. Songs write themselves. My work ethic turns off-to-on in a second and I get happy again. I get grateful again.”

The duo said they’re three-quarters done with the follow-up to The Heist, with Lewis drawing inspiration from the methodically textured records of Led Zeppelin, Queen, Pink Floyd and the Beatles, while a larger budget allowed him to indulge his production whims.

Haggerty, for his part, didn’t reveal much about the album’s lyrical content, though he did hint at a quasi-sequel to “White Privilege” off his 2005 solo record, The Language of My World. While the original, Haggerty said, was more of a cultural observation, he acknowledged his vantage point is significantly different now that his detractors have accused him of being an example of cultural appropriation and white privilege in hip-hop.

“How do I participate in this conversation in a way that I’m not preaching, where I’m not appearing like I know it all?,” the rapper said. “‘Cause I don’t know it all… How do I affect change? How do I not preach to the choir? How do I authentically initiate discourse without co-opting the movement that’s already happening? You are constantly having to check your intention as a white person doing any sort of antiracist work.”

To bolster his understanding of racism and how he can help inspire honest, earnest change, Haggerty attended a daylong seminar about the causes and effects of institutionalized racism. Beyond music, he said, he hopes that his next tour with Lewis can incorporate a series of town hall meetings in various cities with the help of local artists.

“A concert’s not going to do it,” Haggerty said. “Regardless of the song that I write, or that ends up coming out, it’s not going to do it. It’s going to be a tiny piece. This needs to be part of my life’s work if I’m going to be authentic in the discourse.”

Read the full interview at Complex.

Macklemore Discusses Drug Relapse, New Album

Seattle rapper Macklemore, real name Ben Haggerty, admitted in a new cover story for Complex that he relapsed into taking pills and smoking weed following the monumental success of his 2013 LP with Ryan Lewis, The Heist. His recovery, however, was crucial in inspiring the duo’s new album, slated to arrive later this year.

“I was burnt out,” Haggerty said. “I was super-stressed. We weren’t sleeping — doing a show every day, zigzagging all over the country. In terms of the media, I was getting put into a box that I never saw for myself. The pressure and the fame — everything. All the clichés, man — like not being able to walk around, having no privacy, and from this TV appearance to this TV appearance, and the criticism, and the lack of connection, and the lack of [12-step] meetings — all of that put into one pie was just… I just wanted to escape.”

Haggerty copped to sneaking around to get high and promising to get clean but never following through. Lewis said he noticed a change in his partner’s behavior, too, especially when progress on their new album stalled. But it wasn’t until his fiancé Tricia Davis learned she was pregnant that the rapper again embraced sobriety.

“And, as it always works, the minute that I start actively seeking recovery — not just sobriety, but recovery — music is there,” Haggerty said. “It always has been. Songs write themselves. My work ethic turns off-to-on in a second and I get happy again. I get grateful again.”

The duo said they’re three-quarters done with the follow-up to The Heist, with Lewis drawing inspiration from the methodically textured records of Led Zeppelin, Queen, Pink Floyd and the Beatles, while a larger budget allowed him to indulge his production whims.

Haggerty, for his part, didn’t reveal much about the album’s lyrical content, though he did hint at a quasi-sequel to “White Privilege” off his 2005 solo record, The Language of My World. While the original, Haggerty said, was more of a cultural observation, he acknowledged his vantage point is significantly different now that his detractors have accused him of being an example of cultural appropriation and white privilege in hip-hop.

“How do I participate in this conversation in a way that I’m not preaching, where I’m not appearing like I know it all?,” the rapper said. “‘Cause I don’t know it all… How do I affect change? How do I not preach to the choir? How do I authentically initiate discourse without co-opting the movement that’s already happening? You are constantly having to check your intention as a white person doing any sort of antiracist work.”

To bolster his understanding of racism and how he can help inspire honest, earnest change, Haggerty attended a daylong seminar about the causes and effects of institutionalized racism. Beyond music, he said, he hopes that his next tour with Lewis can incorporate a series of town hall meetings in various cities with the help of local artists.

“A concert’s not going to do it,” Haggerty said. “Regardless of the song that I write, or that ends up coming out, it’s not going to do it. It’s going to be a tiny piece. This needs to be part of my life’s work if I’m going to be authentic in the discourse.”

Read the full interview at Complex.

Roger Goodell upholds Patriots QB Tom Brady’s four-game suspension – USA TODAY


USA TODAY
Roger Goodell upholds Patriots QB Tom Brady's four-game suspension
USA TODAY
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell upheld Tom Brady's four-game Deflategate suspension Tuesday, citing the New England Patriots quarterback's decision to have his cell phone destroyed before a meeting with an NFL-backed investigator as a key piece of …
Pro Football|How Would You Destroy Your Cellphone?New York Times
Reviewing how Tom Brady suspension will impact the JetsESPN (blog)
Statement from Tom Brady's agent, Don YeeWashington Post
Bloomberg -Yahoo Sports -Boston Globe
all 1,213 news articles »

5 year old is going to be a great stuntman

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This five year old has the perfect look on his face while going drifting with his stunt-driver dad. The two of them make an annual tradition out of doing this.

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Letting The Freedom Of Truth Uncover The Value Of Life

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